Generalized Image Acquisition and Analysis

On Plenoptic Multiplexing and Reconstruction

Photography has been striving to capture an ever increasing amount of visual information in a single image. Digital sensors, however, are limited to recording a small subset of the desired information at each pixel. A common approach to overcoming the limitations of sensing hardware is the optical multiplexing of high-dimensional data into a photograph. While this is a well-studied topic for imaging with color filter arrays, we develop a mathematical framework that generalizes multiplexed imaging to all dimensions of the plenoptic function. This framework unifies a wide variety of existing approaches to analyze and reconstruct multiplexed data in either the spatial or the frequency domain. We demonstrate many practical applications of our framework including high-quality light field reconstruction, the first comparative noise analysis of light field attenuation masks, and an analysis of aliasing in multiplexing applications.

Projects

Fluorescent Immersion Range Scanning

Matthias Hullin, Martin Fuchs, Ivo Ihrke, Hans-Peter Seidel, Hendrik P. A. Lensch
In: Proceedings of SIGGRAPH 2008.



Abstract

The quality of a 3D range scan should not depend on the surface properties of the object. Most active range scanning techniques, however, assume a diffuse reflector to allow for a robust detection of incident light patterns. In our approach we embed the object into a fluorescent liquid. By analyzing the light rays that become visible due to fluorescence rather than analyzing their reflections off the surface, we can detect the intersection points between the projected laser sheet and the object surface for a wide range of different materials. For transparent objects we can even directly depict a slice through the object in just one image by matching its refractive index to the one of the embedding liquid. This enables a direct sampling of the object geometry without the need for computational reconstruction. This way, a high-resolution 3D volume can be assembled simply by sweeping a laser plane through the object. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our light sheet range scanning approach on a set of objects manufactured from a variety of materials and material mixes, including dark, translucent and transparent objects.
Project Page Video Data Set

Bibtex

@article{Hullin:2008:FIRS,
title = "Fluorescent Immersion Range Scanning",
author = "Matthias B. Hullin and Martin Fuchs and Ivo Ihrke and Hans-Peter Seidel and
Hendrik P. A. Lensch",
journal = "ACM Transactions on Graphics",
volume = 27,
number = 3,
month = aug,
year = 2008,
pages = "87:1--87:10",
}
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