Generalized Image Acquisition and Analysis

Interactive Volume Caustics in Single-Scattering Media

Volume caustics are intricate illumination patterns formed by light first interacting with a specular surface and subsequently being scattered inside a participating medium. Although this phenomenon can be simulated by existing techniques, image synthesis is usually non-trivial and time-consuming. Motivated by interactive applications, we propose a novel volume caustics rendering method for single-scattering participating media. Our method is based on the observation that line rendering of illumination rays into the screen buffer establishes a direct light path between the viewer and the light source. This connection is introduced via a single scattering event for every pixel affected by the line primitive. Since the GPU is a parallel processor, the radiance contributions of these light paths to each of the pixels can be computed and accumulated independently. The implementation of our method is straightforward and we show that it can be seamlessly integrated with existing methods for rendering participating media. We achieve high-quality results at real-time frame rates for large and dynamic scenes containing homogeneous participating media. For inhomogeneous media, our method achieves interactive performance that is close to real-time. Our method is based on a simplified physical model and can thus be used for generating physically plausible previews of expensive lighting simulations quickly.

Projects

Synchronization and Rolling Shutter Compensation for Consumer Video Camera Arrays

Derek Bradley, Bradley Atcheson, Ivo Ihrke, Wolfgang Heidrich
In: Proceedings of PROCAMS 2009 (2nd best paper).



Abstract

Two major obstacles to the use of consumer camcorders in computer vision applications are the lack of synchronization hardware, and the use of a "rolling" shutter, which introduces a temporal shear in the video volume. We present two simple approaches for solving both the rolling shutter shear and the synchronization problem at the same time. The first approach is based on strobe illumination, while the second employs a subframe warp along optical flow vectors. In our experiments we have used the proposed methods to effectively remove temporal shear, and synchronize up to 16 consumer-grade camcorders in multiple geometric configurations.
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Bibtex

@INPROCEEDINGS{Bradley:2009,
author = {Derek Bradley and Bradley Atcheson and Ivo Ihrke and Wolfgang Heidrich},
title = {Synchronization and Rolling Shutter Compensation for Consumer Video Camera Arrays},
journal = {International Workshop on Projector-Camera Systems (PROCAMS 2009)},
year = {2009},
}
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